Google Public DNS

By | 14/01/2010

For most users, DNS lookups are handled automatically through an Internet service provider; they’re not tasks most of us see or devote much thought to. You do have the option, however, of using your own third-party DNS resolver. That’s where Google Public DNS comes in.

Google Public DNS is a free, global Domain Name System (DNS) resolution service, that you can use as an alternative to your current DNS provider.

To try it out:

  • Configure your network settings to use the IP addresses and as your DNS servers or
  • Read Google configuration instructions.

Google Public DNS and Your Privacy

What exactly will Google be watching with its new Google Public DNS service?

Here’s the breakdown of what is and isn’t collected:

• Your IP address: yes. But only temporarily. That data, Google says, is never stored for more than 24 to 48 hours, and it’s collected solely to identify technical problems and help protect from attacks.

• Your name or other personally identifying information: no. Google assures this type of data is never collected.

• Your location: yes. Google says it permanently stores “metro-level” info on your whereabouts for the purpose of debugging and improving the Google Public DNS experience. Most of this information is held for two weeks, Google says, though a “small subset” is sampled for permanent storage. The company promises that it never ties the location data to any other information collected from your session.

• The Web sites you look up: yes. But again, Google says that information is not stored along with any data that would identify who you are.

• Lots of technical details: yes. Google Public DNS permanently logs technical items such as your request type, transport protocol, and the length of time it takes the system to complete your requests. You can see a full list of these technical details on Google’s official Public DNS privacy policy.

None of the information collected, Google says, is ever tied to your Google account, stored as part of your profile on any other Google service, or shared with any third-party provider.

Google Public DNS: More Resources

If you want more detailed information about Google Public DNS, check out some of the following resources:

Google Public DNS: An Introduction

Google Public DNS: Performance Benefits

Google Public DNS: Security Benefits

Google Public DNS: Setup Instructions and Support

Google Public DNS: Privacy Policy

Google Public DNS: Official FAQ


Some users will say that providing public DNS servers is just another step in Google’s world domination plans. Others might find out that the benefits outweigh the doubts and concerns. It is definitely not bad to have another option in this field especially with the increasing censorship around the world

Source: Google

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